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Yemen: WHO reports 5000 new cholera cases per day

WHO reports 5000 new suspected cases of cholera per day as epidemic worsens, with 1500 dead and 246,000 sick since April

04 Jul 02:15 PM UTC
TIMEFRAME expected from 7/1/2017, 12:00 AM until 7/1/2017, 11:59 PM (Asia/Aden). COUNTRY/REGION Yemen

Event

A representative of the World Health Organization (WHO) said in a news conference in Sana'a on Saturday, July 1, that cholera has killed 1500 people and sickened roughly 246,000 since April as the epidemic has spread to 21 out of the country's 22 provinces. According to WHO, the number of suspected cholera cases has multiplied tenfold over the past two months, with 5000 new cases reported every day.

Context

Yemen has been engaged in a complex and deadly conflict since Houthi rebels started fighting the international coalition-backed government in 2015.

In early 2017, the United Nations humanitarian aid office in Yemen announced that the civilian death toll had reached 10,000, with another 40,000 people wounded and 10 million in need of emergency assistance. According to the UN, the country is on the brink of famine, with 7 million people going hungry. Approximately 18.8 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance and the crisis has placed an overwhelming strain on the country's health system. Major health facilities have been destroyed in the conflict and aid deliveries are often blocked by rebels, stolen, or destroyed. The port of Al-Hodeida, one of the largest ports of the country, is blocked by rebels and threatened by the conflict, which prevents international aid from entering the country.

Cholera is an infectious disease caused by the Vibrio cholerae bacteria that can induce acute diarrhea. The risk of death is greatest among people with compromised immune systems, such as malnourished children or those living with HIV. However, even among healthy adults, cholera can be fatal within a matter of hours.

Advice

To reduce the risk of contracting cholera, wash hands regularly, drink only bottled or purified water, and avoid eating raw or undercooked foods. Seek immediate medical care if you believe you may have contracted the disease.

The security environment in Yemen remains complex. Due to poor security conditions, many Western governments strongly advise their citizens against all travel to Yemen. Travel to the country should only be considered with proper security protocols in place.

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